Tag: wisconsin attorney

Many states across the country have taken steps to legalize marijuana for personal use. However, it is vital to note that Wisconsin is not among these states. Wisconsin drug laws strictly prohibit the use, possession, and sale of marijuana and associated paraphernalia. Furthermore, driving under the influence of marijuana can result in severe penalties, especially after multiple convictions.

Understanding Wisconsin’s marijuana and driving laws can help you know what steps to take if you are facing drugged driving charges. Working with an experienced Wisconsin defense attorney can help maximize your chances of avoiding the harshest penalties.

 

What Are the Penalties for Marijuana Possession in WI?

In Wisconsin, marijuana possession is considered a criminal offense, and the state imposes some of the harshest penalties in the country. The penalties are as follows:

  • For a first offense, possession is considered a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 6 months in jail and a maximum fine of $1,000.
  • For second and subsequent offenses, possession is a felony, with potential penalties of 3.5 years in prison and fines of up to $10,000.
  • Possession of more than 200 grams of marijuana is considered possession with intent to sell, which carries a potential 15-year prison sentence and up to $50,000 in fines.

 

How Does Wisconsin Law Define Drugged Driving?

It is illegal in Wisconsin to operate a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs, including marijuana. The law prohibits driving or operating a vehicle while:

  • Under the influence of any drug to a degree that renders the person incapable of safe driving
  • With any detectable amount of a restricted controlled substance in their blood

For marijuana, any amount over one ng/mL of THC in the blood can lead to an Operating While Impaired (OWI) charge.

 

What Are the Penalties for Drugged Driving in WI?

The penalties for an OWI drug conviction in Wisconsin depend on the number of prior offenses and any aggravating factors. In general:

  • A first OWI offense is a civil violation with potential fines of $150-$300.
  • A second offense within ten years is a criminal misdemeanor with up to 6 months of jail time and a license revocation of one year to 18 months, as well as fines of up to $1100.
  • A third offense is a misdemeanor with up to one year of jail time and a license revocation of up to three years, as well as fines of up to $2,000.
  • Fourth and subsequent offenses are felonies with up to six years of prison time, a license revocation of up to three years, as well as fines of up to $10,000

 

How an Attorney Can Help 

Working with an experienced Wisconsin marijuana defense attorney can maximize your chances of success in your case by:

  • Challenging the legality of law enforcement’s search and seizure
  • Questioning the accuracy of sobriety tests
  • Negotiating a plea bargain for lesser charges

 

Get Legal Help Today

If you’ve been arrested for or charged with marijuana possession or OWI, the skilled and knowledgeable attorneys at J. Kippa Law, LLC, understand how much your future depends on a solid legal defense. With us on your side, you can feel confident about the path forward. Call us today at (920) 733-1100 or contact us online for a confidential meeting with an attorney.

The term “sexual violence” encompasses a range of actions that violate someone’s trust or safety and involve sexual intent. This category includes both physical acts and non-physical acts. Physical acts of sexual violence can include forced sexual intercourse or unwanted touching. Non-physical acts of sexual violence can include secretly watching someone (voyeurism) or exposing oneself inappropriately.

In Wisconsin, “sexual assault” is the catchall legal term for all illegal sexual activities and acts of sexual violence. Its meaning is outlined in Wisconsin law and covers various actions considered illegal and punishable under the law.

How Does Wisconsin Law Define Sexual Assault?

Wisconsin’s sexual assault law classifies four different degrees of sexual assault, each with specific conditions and penalties:

  • Fourth-Degree Sexual Assault: This is a Class A misdemeanor. Fourth-degree sexual assault involves sexual contact without consent.
  • Third-Degree Sexual Assault: This is a Class G felony. Third-degree sexual assault includes sexual intercourse without consent.
  • Second-Degree Sexual Assault: This is a Class C felony. It is sexual contact or intercourse without consent involving the use of force or threat or causing injury or mental anguish needing psychiatric care. It could also include nonconsensual sexual contact or intercourse with a person who cannot understand or resist due to mental illness, intoxication, unconsciousness, or who is a patient in certain facilities. It also includes assault by correctional staff on inmates and by probation, parole, or supervision agents on individuals under their supervision.
  • First-Degree Sexual Assault: This is a Class B felony. It includes forced sexual contact or intercourse without consent that results in pregnancy or great bodily harm or that involves a dangerous weapon. It also includes assault aided by others or against a person 60 or older.

What Should I Do If I Have Been Assaulted in Wisconsin?

If you have been the target of sexual assault in Wisconsin, remember that what happened is not your fault, and there are resources available to support you. Here are some steps you can take to protect your safety and rights:

  • Preserve Evidence: Avoid showering, changing clothes, or cleaning up until after you have undergone a medical examination. This helps in preserving crucial evidence.
  • Seek Medical Attention: Visit a doctor or a hospital as soon as possible, even if you do not have visible injuries. Medical professionals can provide necessary care, check for hidden injuries, and collect important evidence through a forensic examination.
  • Consider Reporting the Assault: It is your right to report the assault to the police, but this not a decision you necessarily have to make now. You can always have a forensic exam and decide later about reporting.
  • Contact a Lawyer: Consider speaking with a lawyer who handles sexual assault cases. They can advise you on your rights and options and assist you if you choose to pursue legal action.
  • Reach Out for Support: Connect with a local sexual assault service provider for counseling and guidance. Wisconsin has numerous organizations dedicated to helping sexual assault survivors.

Contact a Sexual Assault Injury Attorney in Wisconsin

At J. Kippa Law, LLC, we understand that talking to a stranger can feel overwhelming after a traumatic event like sexual assault. But taking that first step can be a courageous move toward healing and justice.

Our commitment is to stand by your side, help you understand your rights, and explore the best legal options available to you.

We believe in empowering our clients through respectful, compassionate, and confidential legal assistance. Contact us today to learn more about your rights in an initial case review.

Wisconsin’s legislative framework categorizes sexual assault into different degrees based on the severity of the offenses. Wisconsin’s sexual assault laws encompass a range of offenses, including first-degree and second-degree sexual assault, as well as third-degree sexual assault, which specifically addresses cases involving minors. Each degree carries its own set of punishment guidelines, considering factors such as force used, the age of the victim, and the relationship between the victim and the perpetrator.

Sexual Assault Penalties in Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, sexual assault charges are divided into different degrees, each carrying its own set of penalties.

First Degree Sexual Assault:

First-degree sexual assault is the most serious category of sexual assault offenses in Wisconsin. It involves sexual contact or sexual intercourse with another person without consent that results in pregnancy, causes the victim great bodily harm, involves use of weapon, and involves force or coercion. First-degree sexual assault is classified as a Class B Felony, carrying penalties of up to 60 years in prison and fines of up to $100,000.

Second Degree Sexual Assault:

Second-degree sexual assault includes acts of sexual contact or sexual intercourse without consent, but under circumstances that do not fall within the criteria for first-degree sexual assault. This can involve instances where the victim is coerced, threatened, or incapacitated. Second-degree sexual assault is considered a Class C Felony, which carries potential penalties of up to 40 years in prison and fines of up to $100,000.

Third Degree Sexual Assault:

Third degree sexual assault is sexual intercourse that occurs without consent that occurs along with excretion of bodily fluids on the victim. Third-degree sexual assault is a Class G Felony. If found guilty of this offense, individuals may face imprisonment for up to 10 years and fines of up to $25,000.

Fourth Degree Sexual Assault:

Fourth-degree sexual assault encompasses cases where there is inappropriate sexual contact without the consent of the victim. This degree involves actions such as unwanted touching, groping, or fondling. Fourth-degree sexual assault is typically charged as a Class A Misdemeanor. Convictions can lead to imprisonment for up to nine months and fines not exceeding $10,000.

Factors that Affect Sexual Assault Penalties in Wisconsin

Aggravating factors in sexual assault cases are circumstances that worsen the offense and can lead to more severe charges and penalties. Here are some common examples:

  • Use of a weapon
  • Multiple victims
  • Age of the victim

On the other hand, mitigating factors can decrease the severity of sexual assault charges and penalties. These factors take into account specific circumstances that may reduce the culpability of the offender or indicate an opportunity for rehabilitation. Some common mitigating factors include:

  • Lack of prior criminal history
  • Cooperation with law enforcement
  • Accountability and rehabilitation efforts

Consent and Sexual Assault in Wisconsin

Wisconsin law defines consent as explicit agreement given voluntarily by each participant involved in a sexual act. Consent should be informed, ongoing, and freely given without coercion or manipulation. It is important to note that individuals who are incapacitated due to intoxication, drugs, age, mental incapacity, or unconsciousness cannot provide consent.

In cases involving sexual assault, the presence or absence of consent plays a central role in determining charges and penalties. If a person engages in sexual activity without obtaining clear and voluntary consent from the other party, it can result in criminal sexual assault charges.

Other Considerations in Sexual Assault Cases in Wisconsin

Sexual assault cases are taken very seriously in Wisconsin, with prosecutors working diligently to build strong cases against the accused. Once a report is filed, an investigation is initiated, evidence is gathered, and testimonies from both the victim and any witnesses are collected.

Victim impact statements play a vital role during sentencing hearings in sexual assault cases. These statements offer survivors an opportunity to share their personal experiences, the emotional and psychological impact of the assault, and how it has affected their lives. By giving survivors a voice, these statements provide the court with a deeper understanding of the harm caused and help guide sentencing decisions. These statements empower survivors to express their feelings, fears, and hopes for their own healing process while allowing the court to consider the long-term consequences of the assault on the victim’s well-being.

Megan’s Law, officially known as the Sexual Offender Registration and Community Notification Laws, plays a significant role in Wisconsin’s handling of sexual assault cases. This law requires convicted sex offenders to register their personal information, including their address and other details, with local law enforcement agencies. This information may be made available to the public, taking into account the level of risk posed by the offender.

Consult With a Criminal Defense Attorney Experienced in Defending Sexual Assault Cases

In conclusion, the severity of sexual assault and its lasting impact on survivors cannot be overstated. If you or someone you know is facing allegations of sexual assault in Wisconsin, it is crucial to seek immediate legal assistance from an experienced criminal defense lawyer. They will protect your rights, provide support, and guide you through the legal process. Don’t go through this alone; take action and contact a trusted law firm today to ensure justice is served.

 

Are you familiar with the age-old courtroom drama, where lawyers passionately argue their cases in front of a jury of twelve? It’s a scene we often see in movies and television shows, but did you know that not all trials involve a jury? In fact, there is another type of trial known as a bench trial, where the judge takes on the role typically played by jurors. If you’ve ever wondered about the differences between these two types of trials and how to choose which one is right for your case, read on. In this blog post, we will discuss the key distinctions between bench trials and jury trials and provide insights to help navigate this important decision.

What is a Bench Trial?

In essence, during a bench trial, it’s up the judge to make all critical decisions regarding law interpretations and factual determinations based solely on presented evidence and arguments from both parties involved. Some may argue that this puts immense power into one person’s hands; others may see it as an efficient way to streamline complex cases without relying on diverse opinions.

What is a Jury Trial?

A jury trial is a court proceeding in which a jury makes a decision about a case. The jury is made up of ordinary citizens who are chosen to serve on the jury by the court. The judge presides over the trial and instructs the jury on the law, but it is the jury that decides whether the defendant is guilty or not guilty.

Key Differences Between the Two

When it comes to deciding whether to have a bench trial or jury trial, there are a few key differences to keep in mind. For one, in a jury trial, a group of peers will hear the evidence and decide the verdict, whereas in a bench trial, the judge will serve as both the finder of fact and law. Additionally, jury trials tend to be more formal than bench trials, as they require more extensive questioning of witnesses and longer closing arguments. Jury trials are typically more expensive than bench trials since they require more resources.

Pros and Cons of Each Trial Type

When it comes to choosing a trial type, there are two main options: bench trials and jury trials. Both have their own pros and cons that you should consider before making a decision.

Bench Trials Pros

Generally speaking, bench trials tend to be shorter than jury trials. This is because there is only one judge hearing the case rather than a panel of jurors. Bench trials also tend to be less expensive than jury trials, as they require fewer people and resources. Another pro is that because the judge is the only one who decides the outcome of the case, there is generally more control over the outcome of a bench trial. Finally, some people feel that bench trials are fairer than jury trials, as jurors may be influenced by their personal beliefs or experiences.

Bench Trial Cons

The disadvantage of having a shorter trial is that there is less time for both sides to present their case. Additionally, because the judge is the only one making a decision in a bench trial, some people feel that this can lead to bias or partiality. For these reasons, some people prefer to have a jury of their peers decide their case rather than a single judge.

Jury Trials Pros

Jury trials tend to be more thorough than bench trials, as there are multiple jurors who must come to an agreement on the outcome of the case. Furthermore, this agreement must be unanimous, which ensures that both sides receive fair consideration. Having a jury of peers decide a case can also provide more assurance that justice will be served.  Additionally, juries may be better equipped to evaluate complex cases, as they are not experts in law like judges are.

Jury Trial Cons

Jury trials tend to take much longer than bench trials and require more resources. This can increase the cost of having a trial significantly. Additionally, because jurors must come to an agreement unanimously on the outcome of the case, this can lead to long deliberations and deadlocks. Furthermore, jury selection can often take up a large portion of time during trial preparation and may result in bias or prejudice towards one side of the case. Lastly, some people feel that jury trials are too unpredictable, as there is no guarantee that the jurors will reach an agreement in the end.

How to Choose the Right Trial for Your Case

The choice of whether to have a bench trial or a jury trial is an important one. The key difference between the two is that in a bench trial, the judge renders the verdict, while in a jury trial, it is a group of jurors who decide the case. There are pros and cons to both types of trials, and the best option for you will depend on your specific case. Here are some things to consider when making your decision:

  • The severity of the crime
  • The amount of evidence
  • The complexity of the case
  • Your personal preference

Contact a Wisconsin Criminal Defense Attorney

Bench trials and jury trials are both important parts of the American justice system, offering different advantages and disadvantages depending on your situation. Understanding the key differences between these two types of trials will help you make an informed decision about which one is right for your case. Ultimately, it’s up to you to decide whether a bench or jury trial is best for your purpose, but considering all of the factors involved can help ensure that you choose wisely. If you’re wondering whether you should choose a bench or jury trial, it’s best to consult an experienced criminal defense attorney.

 

Facing charges related to prostitution can be a frightening experience. The complex legal landscape surrounding these offenses requires individuals to have a solid understanding of their rights and available legal options. In this blog post, we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the steps you should consider taking when confronting prostitution-related charges. From knowing your fundamental rights to engaging the right legal representation, we’ll explore the various strategies and resources that can help you build a strong defense

Know Your Rights

When accused of a prostitution-related offense, it is crucial to be aware of your basic legal rights. Understanding these rights empowers you to make informed decisions and ensure your protection throughout the legal process. Here are three fundamental rights that individuals have when facing prostitution-related charges:

The Right to Remain Silent

You have the constitutional right to remain silent when questioned by law enforcement or prosecutors. This means that you are not obligated to answer any questions that may incriminate you. Exercise this right to avoid inadvertently providing evidence that could be used against you.

The Right to an Attorney

You have the right to legal representation, regardless of your financial situation. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed to you. It is crucial to engage the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney who specializes in prostitution-related cases. Your attorney will provide guidance, protect your rights, and construct a strong defense strategy on your behalf.

The Right to a Fair Trial

Every individual accused of a crime, including prostitution offenses, is entitled to a fair trial. This means that you have the right to present your defense, challenge the evidence against you, cross-examine witnesses, and have a neutral judge or jury preside over your case. Ensuring fairness during the trial process is essential to protect your rights and attain a just outcome.

 

Engaging Legal Representation

Obtaining the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney holds immense importance when facing charges of this nature. Legal representation plays a crucial role in protecting your rights, guiding you through the complex legal process, and constructing a robust defense strategy tailored to your case.

 

Firstly, an attorney with expertise in prostitution laws possesses the in-depth knowledge required to analyze the specifics of your case. They understand the intricate legal nuances surrounding these offenses, enabling them to identify potential defenses and develop a strategic approach that aligns with your unique circumstances.

 

Additionally, a skilled attorney will ensure the protection of your rights throughout the legal proceedings. They will serve as your advocate, advising you on when to exercise your right to remain silent, ensuring law enforcement respects your fundamental rights during questioning or searches, and safeguarding you from self-incrimination.

Case Evaluation

A thorough case evaluation by an attorney can help immensely when it comes to prostitution offenses. A case evaluation involves a comprehensive review of the evidence, identification of potential defenses, and a careful assessment of the strength of the prosecution’s case.

 

One of the primary objectives of a case evaluation is the review of evidence. An attorney can scrutinize every piece of evidence related to the prostitution offense. This includes examining documents, phone records, surveillance footage, witness statements, and any other relevant materials. Through this process, attorneys search for any inconsistencies, errors, or gaps in the evidence that can cast doubt on the prosecution’s case. By carefully analyzing the evidence, attorneys can identify potential weaknesses or issues with its collection or presentation.

 

Assessing the strength of the prosecution’s case is also a vital component of case evaluation. Attorneys examine the quality and reliability of the evidence presented by the prosecution. They evaluate the credibility of witnesses, the accuracy of forensic tests, and whether the prosecution has met the burden of proof required for a conviction.

Defense Strategies

One common defense strategy in prostitution-related cases involves challenging the legality of the arrest. If law enforcement violated procedural rights during the arrest or obtained evidence illegally, it may be possible to have the charges dismissed or the evidence suppressed.

 

Questioning the credibility of witnesses or evidence is another effective defense strategy in prostitution cases. An attorney may cross-examine witnesses vigorously, highlighting any contradictions or biases to undermine their credibility. Additionally, attorneys critically assess the credibility and reliability of the evidence presented by the prosecution. This includes scrutinizing forensic tests, surveillance footage, or any other evidence that could be subject to interpretation or manipulation.

 

Negotiating for reduced charges or alternative resolutions is also a valuable defense strategy in prostitution-related cases. Attorneys may engage in plea bargaining with the prosecution to secure lesser charges or penalties. This could involve negotiating for a reduction from a prostitution offense to a lesser offense or seeking alternative resolutions like participation in diversion or rehabilitation programs. These programs aim to address the underlying issues that contribute to the involvement in prostitution and can present an opportunity for a more favorable outcome, such as a dismissal of charges upon successful completion.

Exploring Diversion Programs

When facing prostitution offenses, individuals may have the option to explore diversion programs or alternative sentencing options that can help address underlying issues while avoiding traditional criminal consequences. These programs are designed to divert individuals away from the standard criminal justice system and towards rehabilitative services. They recognize that many individuals involved in prostitution face complex challenges such as substance abuse, poverty, or exploitation. Instead of focusing solely on punishment, diversion programs aim to address the root causes of the behavior and provide support for rehabilitation.

 

It is important to note that eligibility for diversion programs may depend on factors such as prior criminal history, the nature of the offense, and the individual’s willingness to participate in treatment and counseling. Consulting with an experienced attorney is crucial to understanding the availability and suitability of diversion programs in a specific case.

Support and Resources

Seeking support during the legal process, especially in cases involving prostitution-related offenses, is crucial for individuals to navigate the challenges they may face. There are various resources available that can provide assistance, guidance, and emotional support to help individuals cope with legal proceedings.

 

One valuable resource to consider is counseling services. Engaging in therapy can offer individuals a safe and confidential space to explore their feelings, address trauma, and work toward personal growth. Licensed therapists or counselors with experience in supporting individuals involved in prostitution-related offenses can provide specialized care tailored to their unique needs.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, when facing charges related to prostitution, it is crucial to understand your rights and explore your legal options. Engaging the services of an experienced criminal defense attorney can provide guidance, protect your rights, and develop a strong defense strategy. A thorough case evaluation helps identify potential defenses and assess the strength of the prosecution’s case. Defense strategies such as challenging the legality of the arrest, questioning witness credibility, and exploring alternative resolutions can strengthen your defense. Diversion programs and support resources are also available to address underlying issues and provide assistance during the legal process. By understanding your rights, utilizing available resources, and contacting an experienced criminal defense attorney, you can navigate prostitution offenses with confidence and work towards the best possible outcome in your case.

 

Have you ever wondered what exactly constitutes a property crime? Many criminal offenses fall under this category, from theft and burglary to arson and vandalism. Understanding these crimes’ legal definitions, penalties, and consequences can be crucial in understanding your rights.

Types of Property Crimes in Wisconsin

Many view property crimes as lesser criminal charges with minimum consequences. Some view them as a joke or prank and something easy to get away with. Wisconsin is actually ranked as one of the lowest states for property crimes, with an estimated 1,500 out of 100,000 people affected. Even so, if found guilty of a property crime, the consequences can range from a misdemeanor to a felony charge.

Arson

Arson is the willful, intentional, and malicious destruction of property by fire and is a Class C Felony in Wisconsin. It also includes placing explosives in or near another person’s property. The penalties for arson can be very severe and may incur a prison sentence of up to 40 years and a fine of up to $100,000.

Burglary

Burglary is the unlawful entry into a structure intending to commit a crime, for example, breaking into a home to steal something. It could also apply to mobile homes, boats, train cars, or other commercial buildings. In Wisconsin, The penalties for burglary depend on several factors. For example, were you armed when you entered the structure? Was anyone home? Did you commit battery? While all of these add to the severity of a Burglary charge, it is always a serious crime. If you are found guilty of burglarizing a home or business, it will likely be a felony.

Theft/Motor Vehicle Theft

Larceny, or theft, is one of the most common property crimes. It involves taking another person’s property without their permission and intending to deprive them of its use permanently. This includes shoplifting, pickpocketing, and embezzlement. The penalties for theft in Wisconsin can range from a misdemeanor to a felony charge.

Motor vehicle theft can be more severe and occurs when the defendant intends to permanently take and use a car without the owner’s consent. State law also says that unless the car is worth less than $2,500, theft of the vehicle is considered a felony.

Shoplifting

Shoplifting is a property crime where someone takes merchandise from a store without paying for it. Shoplifting is a crime in all 50 states and can be punishable by fines, jail time, or both. The penalties for shoplifting depend on the value of the merchandise taken and even the offender’s criminal history. It can be either a misdemeanor or a felony in Wisconsin.

Vandalism

Vandalism is defined as intentionally damaging someone else’s property. This can mean anything from spray painting graffiti on a wall to smashing a window. The penalties for vandalism depend on the monetary amount of damages incurred. If it was less than $2,500, it was a misdemeanor, and if it was more, it was a felony.

No matter what property crime you are charged with, there are levels of severity. It is wise to contact an attorney with experience in property crimes to defend your case and answer any questions you may have before facing the prosecution.

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